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This member is a YANA Mentor This is his Country or State Flag

John Stankus and Lori live in Washington, USA. He was 48 when he was diagnosed in September, 2008. His initial PSA was 158.00 ng/ml, his Gleason Score was 7, and he was staged T3a. His choice of treatment was Surgery (Retropubic Prostatectomy + RT + ADT). Here is his story.

I have already went through a bone scan, x-rays for a suspected tumor, which was negative, biopsy, and now a second biopsy required so that I can participate in the a clinical study at the University of Washington. Lots of poking and prodding.

I'm running very scared, but after reading stories about other patients and survivors, this really helps. My last meeting with the Doctor was alarming and horrible news.

There's a possibility of losing my bladder, lymph nodes, and rectum. What a quality of of life, but on the other side things could be worse.

UPDATED

December 2008

Thought that it might be a good idea to give an update where I'm presently at with my treatment.

For the last six weeks I was in a clinical study for the drug Sorafenib, which had some very interesting side effects. The hand/feet syndrome was so bad, I got to a point I could barely walk, so my Doctor placed me on a half dose, which helped, but still healing from the side effects. Today is my last day for the drug and I have started the liquid diet in preparation for surgery in two days.

The unknown still exists on how extensive the surgery will. Surgeon stated that the prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes will be removed, but the bladder and rectum is still in question. So far, I don't know how extensive the surgery will be until it's over.

The waiting and wondering has been very emotional and difficult to deal with. Will update once, I'm out of surgery and back on my feet.

Later:

Update December 22, 2008 The surgery went well, which I was explained to from the Surgeon. Outcome was better then originally expected. The Surgeons were able to remove the prostate with cancer tumor, lymph nodes, seminal vesicles, and a portion of the bladder that contained cancer. The cancer was on the upper portion of the bladder and not too large, so the Surgeons were able to remove it, make the repair, which just made the bladder smaller. So, in turn, this was great news, I was able to keep my bladder and rectum. The Surgeon stated that he felt everything went very well for the surgery and the outcome was better than expected.

I was discharged from the U of W hospital on Saturday afternoon 12/20/08. The U of W hospital had to wean me from the pain meds and make sure that I ate some food before I could be discharged. With the big storm coming, this had some influence on getting me out of the hospital and home sooner. Since I've been home, the pain has been horrible, but the pain meds have helped to offset some of it. Nothing like the pain meds, epidural, and IV at the hospital offers. I'm still pretty weak, but seem to be getting better each day.

Eating food has been an ongoing battle. After surgery, nothing tasted good and all food was very difficult to chew and swallow. Each day, I've been able to eat a little more food, but still having problems with tasting part of it. I've never been through surgery before, so I'm assuming that this is one of the liquid diet and surgery side effects. I'm walking as much as possible, which helps the digestive system and to bring the strength back. Having this snowy weather and being stuck inside of the house really sucks.

Besides all of the pain and the various fluid bags attached to my body, I'm doing pretty well. Hopefully all of the bags will be removed between 10-21 days. I'm going back for a follow up appointment with the Surgeon in three weeks. The Surgeon stated after surgery, that I would be OOS for a minimum of six weeks, unless something changes.

Update December 26, 2008 Because of weather, I'm stuck at home experiencing soreness and pains in the abdominal area from the surgery. The incisions from the surgery and drain bags are the most uncomfortable. There seems to be a lot of swelling in my upper thighs and scrotum. At times the swelling was so intense, I couldn't believe my eyes. If I lay around, it seems to give the body a chance to drain off some of the fluids.

Eating food seems to be getting better. I have found that small portions work better, than trying to indulge in a large meal. The taste buds are still not the same. It's really weird; foods have a different taste than they did before the surgery.

Sleeping is unpleasant. Being stuck on your back and not able to roll is very uncomfortable. I can not wait until the catheter and drain bags are gone. Sleeping will become more pleasant and comfortable.

Overall, I know that things could be worse, so I'm just complaining to help me feel better. Yeah right.

I would like to take this time to THANK everyone for all of the prayers, thoughts, and sympathy. No one can imagine how much of a boost that was for me before surgery and also after surgery. It helped with my outcome. Some way or another, I will repay your thoughtfulness.

UPDATED

March 2009

The month of February has passed and the journey with prostate cancer continues on. At my 8 week post surgery Doctor's appointment and my first PSA test since surgery, the news I was given from the Doctor's wasn't what I wanted to hear after the surgery. My PSA test results for that day were 10.08 ng/mL. Before surgery, the Doctor's did comment that there would be a highly probable chance of an elevated PSA and there would be additional treatment available. All along, I had high hopes that this wasn't the news that I was going to receive, so I've came to the conclusion that it is what it is and I can't change it.

During my last appointment, I've agreed with the Oncologist, Urologist, and Radiologist to start ADT therapy and Radiation in two weeks. The ADT therapy would be continue for approximately 2-3 years depending how the cancer reacts and would also be supplemented with 8 weeks of Radiation treatments for a total of 40 sessions. None of this treatment sounded very good to me, especially when the Radiologist mentioned that I could possibly loose another 20 percent of my bladder. This really made me upset, since I had already lost 50 percent of the capacity during the prostatectomy. On top of that news, there are a number of side effects to go along with the both treatments. These treatments are something that I'm really looking forward too, especially after the experiences that I've had so far. I figured that this point in time is just another chapter in the journey with prostate cancer that I have to get through.

At the end of February, I'm 10 weeks post surgery and still have some issues going on, such as incontinence, ED, and a variety of other pains internally. Having to experience ED or incontinence at 49 years old just isn't what I had expected in life. I don't know about others, but having to wear something to assist with going to the bathroom, reminds me of being a child all over again, not even considering the humiliation with all of it. Then I'll mention how the ED is a great combination with the incontinence issues currently going on.

During the day, pads aren't even an option, they're required, and I currently think that since the catheter removal, healing has been a very slow process. I did speak with the Urologist and he mentioned that it could take up to 2 months following the catheter removal to see any major improvement. So, I figured that I've seen some improvement and it will continue to get better everyday. Things could be a lot worse that they currently are.

As far as the ED issues, I've been researching various options and have decided to try the vacuum device and injections. Having to make a decision on what type of device to use for ED, just doesn't feel or sound right. I'm very fortunate to have an outstanding wife of 30 years that's very understanding through this journey in our lives.

Updates will follow.

I would like to thank everyone for the prayers and kind thoughts that I've received, they are greatly appreciated.

God Bless

John Stankus

UPDATED

April 2009

I'm currently 14 weeks post surgery and just recently had my second PSA test. My first PSA test results were 10.08 ng/mL at 8 weeks and now my PSA has dropped to 8.15 ng/mL . Before surgery, the Doctor's did comment that there would be a highly probable chance of an elevated PSA. All of the time I was hoping for 0 PSA, but at least it did drop.

A week ago I started ADT with a Lupron injection that lasts for three months and Casodex orally on a daily basis. The doctors are telling me that I will probably be in this therapy program for at least 2-3 years. I'm really not looking forward to therapy for that long, especially with some of the side effects. The injection was very interesting and sore in that area for a few days. The syringe is very intimidating once you get a visual of it and the nurse breaks the seal and starts shaking it up. The injection went into my back side and was sorer than prior tetanus injections I've received. After a couple of days, the lump and soreness did disappear. The day after the injection, I started getting the hot flashes which ahs been an interesting experience. The hot flashes come and go at various times without any warning. I was driving in to work the other day and it was probably 35 degrees outside when the hot flashes started, so I rolled the window down and turned off the heater in the truck and everything was good. This was crazy getting the hot flash feeling which has happened many times since the start of the ADT therapy.

In two weeks, I'm going back to the Radiologist for the second time to discuss Radiation therapy. During the last visit we discussed the need for me to be healed very well internally or don't start the Radiation therapy. Since I'm still experiencing incontinence issues, I do not want to start the Radiation therapy until the dripping faucet stops. It was discussed that there is a possibility of damaging my bladder during the Radiation therapy which I don't want since I've already lost 50% of my bladder.

During the day, pads still aren't even an option; they're required, since the healing has been a very slow process. I did speak with my Urologist and he mentioned that it could take up to 2 months following the catheter removal to see any major improvement. When I'm sitting or lying down everything is fine until I get up and start moving around, then the faucet starts leaking. Currently I'm using around two pads a day which isn't bad compared to what it used to be. It's only been about 10 weeks since the catheter was removed, so the progress is good, but slow.

The ED issues are still around, but I've tried a few things to see what would work. The Levitra and Cialis didn't help at all, tried them twice and just got a headache. Now the VED (Vaccum Erectile Device) is very interesting and I've only tried it once so far. The VED instruction booklet stated that you need to practice to gain its full potential. I totally agree with the manufacturer after trying it and see that using it more often will make it easier. Grooming is very important to do prior to use otherwise you will cause some self inflicted pain. Also the incontinence issues don't do to well with the VED either. So far, I have found that the penile injections have performed with the best results. The injection process is pretty crazy, but it accomplishes what it is supposed to do.

Being 14 weeks post surgery, I still am sore around the incision area and puffing on my inner thighs. On occasions I get these internal pains which last a short time and then go away. This is probably part of the healing going on inside. My taste buds are finally feeling normal, but on occasion, I do find something that doesn't taste well anymore.

Currently my emotions are still messed up, but nothing like they were when I was first diagnosed with the PCa. This PCa journey is not fun, but it has definitely taken me back a couple of steps and made me really think about what is truly important in this life. Looking back on things, I've been so fortunate to have great medical care from all of the Doctors and Nurses at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and the University of Washington. Without them, I don't believe that I would be doing this well. During this journey, I've been very fortunate to meet some wonderful people that have influenced my progression and I'm very grateful. It's been very difficult, but when someone just makes you laugh about it, that really helps.

God Bless and Peace be with you.

UPDATED

June 2009

Currently I'm 25 weeks post surgery and not really liking the side effects associated with the ADT therapy. The ADT therapy is causing me to have multiple hot flashes through out the day at any time. When the weather is warm outside it is very uncomfortable to deal with. Since I've been a sun worshiper, having these side effects real makes me mad. At times, I'm so emotional because of the hormones, it's crazy. Other times, I get the feeling that I'm this huge basket case. I tell people to just think of me as this huge hormone. Hopefully the treatment isn't forever and this is just a temporary thing. Taking the Casodex on a daily basis is scary not really knowing what the long term effects will be.

In a week I go back in for my second Lupron injection that lasts for three months, which should be loads of fun. The doctors are still telling me that I will probably be in this therapy program for at least 2-3 years. I'm really not looking forward to the ADT therapy for that long, especially with the side effects associated with it. During the appointment I will have my third PSA test since surgery. My last PSA test, the results had dropped to 8.15 ng/mL, which is a little better then the test before. So hopefully this test, the PSA will continue to decline.

Last week, I went back to the Radiologist for the third time to discuss Radiation therapy, had a lower body mold made, and a CT scan done. I explained to the Radiologist that I feel like I'm still healing internally and don't what to start the Radiation therapy yet. I told him again that since I'm still experiencing incontinence issues, I do not want to start the Radiation therapy until the dripping faucet stops. He was in agreement and stated that it is my choice. Again it was discussed that there is a possibility of damaging my bladder during the Radiation therapy which I don't want since I've already lost 50% of my bladder. He stated that other things could be done, if there was damage done. I explained to him that during the day, pads still aren't even an option; they're required. I'm still using around two pads a day which isn't bad compared to what it used to be. It's been about 18 weeks since the catheter was removed, so the progress has been good, but very slow in my eyes. The way we talked, I'm probably going to start radiation treatments around the end of June unless something changes.

After the Radiologist's appointment I really started to have second thoughts about continuing with the radiation treatments. Especially after the possible side effects were explained and signing of the consent form that goes along with it. The Radiologist is going to put a treatment plan together after they finish reviewing the CT scan results. So I do have some time to think about continuing and the Radiologist agreed with me.

Unfortunately the ED issues are still there and I've tried a few things to see what would work, with a little bit of luck. The Levitra, Viagra, and Cialis haven't been much help at all and have really been a waste. They just don't seem to work at all. The VED is okay but does cause some self inflicted pain which isn't very pleasant. Tried to tolerate the pain, but sometimes it's a little too much to bear. The penile injection process is pretty crazy, but it seems to work the best out of all of them sometimes. There have been instances where it just didn't really work at all. According to the Pharmacist, the prescription might need to be changed to a different mixture.

At 25 weeks post surgery, I'm still sore around the incision area and puffy in areas. There appears to be fluid retention possibly on my inner thighs. Occasionally I still get the internal pains which last a short time then go away. I'm assuming that this is just part of the internal healing process. The taste buds appear to be back to normal, but I have found McDonald's French fries just don't taste well anymore. It's really weird, but true; I just can't eat McDonald's French fries anymore, but will eat French fries from other restaurants.

The emotions are still screwed up from the hormone therapy but are better than when I was first diagnosed with the PCa. This PCa journey has made me really think about what is truly important in this life and what isn't. I've taken a much closer look at the family and future, instead of living in the past.

My wife and I have talked about the ADT therapy and radiation treatment really being worth it. At times she sees how hard it has been to get through this part of my life. Once you get the cancer it seems like it becomes the controller of your life. That is the part that I would like to break and continue on with life.

I still feel so fortunate receiving the great medical care from all of the Doctors and Nurses at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and the University of Washington. With them, this journey has been a little easier to continue with. The wonderful people at SCCA and UofW have had a huge influence with my continued healing progression. I'm so very grateful to have this feeling, since I believe it helps with the healing process.

God Bless and Peace be with you.

John Stankus

UPDATED

November 2009

47 weeks post surgery feeling a little better each day and still not liking the side effects associated with the ADT therapy. The Effexor prescription appears to be helping with the hot flashes some what, but I am still an emotional basket case because of the hormones. Trying to deal with the hormones to the best of my abilities. Taking the Casodex pill on a daily basis is still a concern of mine but I'm obeying the doctor's orders at this point in time.

I've been out of touch with everyone for awhile because of a variety of reasons. The first reason is that I have been very wrapped up with my new position at work. Second reason is I am very grateful that I made it this far with this journey and have tried to ignore the cancer thing but it isn't working very well because things keep popping up.

Two months ago I had my third Lupron injection which was so wonderful. Now it is almost time for my next Lupron injection and I am really looking forward to this day. It is loads of fun receiving the concoction of drugs with a good size needle for lasting memories. The Oncologist is stating to me that I will probably be on this therapy program for ADT at least 2+years or until the PSA becomes undetectable.

Eleven months post surgery and my PSA is 0.21 ng/mL which is a whole lot better than the last test of 8.15 ng/mL. The thoughts are positive so far and hopefully the PSA will continue to drop out of sight. I'm not looking forward to the ADT therapy for the next 2 years, especially with the side effects associated, with it. Hopefully the PSA will continue to decline and become undetectable so that I can discontinue the ADT and go on with life.

Every day that I wake up and take a breath is a good day for me. Thinking back it has almost been a year since surgery and a little over a year since initial diagnosis.

Thirteen weeks ago, I completed my 36 sessions of Radiation therapy. What a relief completing this therapy. Plenty of side effects associated with the Radiation Therapy and I am patiently working through each day for encouragement that will help the healing process to continue.

The diet change since the radiation therapy has been very interesting. Reintroducing different foods that I had to cut out during the Radiation therapy has been a challenge. Each day the digestive system shows signs that it is still in the healing mode from Radiation therapy. After 3 months I'm still waiting to see what will heal from the Radiation therapy.

In a couple of weeks I go back to the Radiologist for a check up and PSA test. Hopefully the PSA results will drop or be undetectable.

The bladder is still requiring the use of pads daily. I am seeing continued improvement daily compared to what it was following the surgery. Trying to keep up the kegels exercises and hoping for the best.

The ED issues are still present but showing some progress. We have tried a variety of things some with disappointment and others with very happy times.

Still experiencing soreness around the incision area from the Radical Prostatectomy and puffy in other areas. In which I think is fluid retention from the surgery and Radiation treatments. Occasionally I get internal pains which last a short time then go away varying in intensity. Not sure what they are but, I am assuming that this is just part of the internal healing process.

The taste buds are getting back to normal, but I have still found McDonald's French fries just don't taste well anymore. It's really weird, but true; I just can't eat McDonald's French fries anymore, but will eat French fries from other restaurants.

The emotions are still messed up from the cancer but are better than when I was first diagnosed with the PCa. This PCa journey has made me really think about what is truly important in this life and what isn't. Each day I wake up and see the sun rising is a good day for me. Being with my family and above the dirt is also very good for me.

My wife has been a huge support for me during these challenging times in my life. She is a very strong and loving person that really helps me get through this part of life. Once you get the cancer it seems like it becomes the controller of your life unless you try to prove it differently.

I feel so fortunate receiving the Professional and advanced medical care from all of the Doctors, Nurses, and others at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and the University of Washington Hospital. Without them, I am not sure where this journey would have taken me and what condition I might have been in. The professionals at SCCA and U of W have helped make my cancer journey more comfortable and have had a huge influence with my continued healing progression.

God Bless and Peace be with you.

John Stankus

UPDATED

February 2011

112 weeks post-surgery and still not liking the side effects associated with the ADT therapy. The Effexor prescription appears to be helping very little with the hot flashes. I am still an emotional basket case because of the hormones and other associated cancer takes a ways. Trying to deal with the hormones to the best of my abilities, which isn't fun! I am not taking the Casodex pill on a daily basis which was a concern of mine. My liver functions are now messed up which I think is been caused by all of the medications that I have been required to consume.

I've been out of touch with everyone for a while because of my new position at work. Since the word of Cancer, many things have become urgent with me to complete. My daily schedule has been busy which helps to ward off the Cancer.

I am coming up for my ninth Lupron injection which is hopefully the last of the therapy. It is loads of fun receiving the concoction of drugs with a needle that is sized for horses and provides for lasting memories. The Oncologist has stated to me that my PSA is almost undetectable and the decision to discontinue the ADT will be made at the next blood draw.

Twenty-six months post surgery and my PSA is 0.04 ng/mL which is a whole lot better statistics than I started with. Hopefully the PSA will continue to decline and become undetectable so that I can discontinue the ADT and go on with life.

Every day that I wake up and take a breath is a good day for me. Thinking back it has been 2 years since surgery.

Having completed the 36 sessions of Radiation therapy was probably good and a relief, but it left the scars. Plenty of side effects associated with the Radiation Therapy and I am patiently working through them each day.

The bladder issues still require me to use pads daily. I am seeking options to help improve daily problems following the surgery. Trying to keep up with the Kegel exercises and hoping for the best.

The ED issues are still present and showing very little progress. It is up to the patient to figure out a solution in regards to ED. As a patient it appears that you are on your own when it comes to ED. We have tried a variety of things some with disappointment and others with very happy times.

Still experiencing soreness around the incision area from the Radical Prosectomy, this appears to be getting better. The swelling and puffiness I think is fluid retention from the surgery, Radiation treatments, and the Lymphedema. Occasionally I get these internal pains which last for a short time then go away varying in intensity. Not sure what they are but, I am assuming that this is just part of the internal healing process.

The taste buds are still changing and appear to be getting back to normal. I have found that McDonald's French fries just don't taste well anymore. It's really weird, but true; I just can't eat McDonald's French fries anymore, but can eat French fries from other restaurants. Other foods I haven't found any changes to the menu or diet.

The emotions are still really messed up from the cancer and Hormone Therapy (ADT) but are getting better each day. I have my good days and my bad days but have come to the realization that things could be a whole worst. This PCa journey has made me think about life in a very different way. Each day when I wake up and see the sun rising and setting is a good day for me. Having the ability to be with my family and friends is what life is all about.

Without my wife I don't know where I would be, she has been a huge support for me during these challenging times in my life. Her strength and compassion as a loving person helps me get through this difficult part of my life. Once a person gets the cancer announcement it seems like the cancer becomes the controller of your life unless you try to prove it differently and are persistent about it. Family support helps get through the difficult times I have found.

The Professional and Advanced medical care that I have received from all of the Doctors, Nurses, and others at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and the University of Washington Hospital has helped me to cope with the physiological problems associate with cancer and have provided me with superior medical care. I am not sure where this journey would have taken me and what condition I might have been in without this type of care. I want to thank all of the Professionals at SCCA and U of W that have helped make my cancer journey more comfortable. You have had a huge influence with my continued healing progression.

God Bless and Peace be with you.

John Stankus

UPDATED

May 2012

It has been 3-1/2 years since the radical prostatectomy, the 36 sessions of radiation, and 18 months of ADT. The road has been difficult but the alternative is a lot worse.

Just had my PSA checked on Monday and it is 0.04, which has been consistent for the last 9 months. Now I get to do 6 month followups instead 3 months. This was good news from the Oncologist.

Since the surgery the incontinence has became better but is still present. Today I went through Urodynamic testing to determine if I might be a candidate for additional corrections and the Doctor came back with news saying yes that they can do something. This has brought some good to me which means alot at this time. The Doctors will be installing a sling to help with leakage since the sphincter isn't working correctly.

Following the surgery, I have had ED and have tried the pills, injections, and the pump. The injections worked a little at first and now are ineffective. The vacuum pump works so so, but is better than nothing. At my age this ED issue has been a hard hit and not easy to accept. So today I met with a Doctor that specializes with penile prosthetics. The discussion was very interesting and has convinced me to have the procedure done. The Doctor will be inserting the device internally into the penis and a pump in my scrotum, along with a saline bag next to my bladder connected to the pump. The device is very interesting to view, but also very easy to operate. Statistically the results for this procedure has been very good and comments from patients has also been very good. In about a month I am scheduled for this procedure.

The other problem that I have that the Oncologist hasn't been able to explain to me why I am still getting the hot flashes from the ADT therapy. My testosterone has been increasing which in turn should make the hot flashes decrease, but that hasn't been the case. Next visit to the Onocologist they are going to do some further testing. If you have ever had hot flashes you can relate with me.

Thank you very much for taking the time to read my story. More details will come after my next Doctors visits.

God Bless

UPDATED

July 2012

Done with the Lupron injections but still have lasting memories of the experience. It feels good to be done with that therapy.

The Effexor prescription appears to be helping with the hot flashes finally. Hopefully I will be done with this stuff soon.

Twenty-eight months post surgery and my PSA is 0.00 ng/mL. Woo-hoo!

The bladder issues and pads that I had to use daily are gone. Today I am 3 weeks post-surgery for a male sling and it works. Supposedly I was told that the surgeon that performed this surgery is the best in his field. All I know it is working and I haven't been this happy for a long time.

Today is 3 weeks post-surgery for a penile prosthesis to correct the ED issues. Had a follow-up yesterday with Urologist and he said that I am healing well and will be able to try out the device in 3 weeks. This is so exciting. No more injections, pumps, or disappointment. This is a huge change for quality of life.

My wife has been a huge support for me during these surgeries. Without her I don't know how I could have made it through this journey. She now is also excited for me, because when my quality of improves, so does hers.

Again I want to thank all of the Doctors, Nurses, and others at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance and the University of Washington Hospital for the superior medical care and compassion that you have provided for me during this journey with Prostate Cancer.

God Bless and Peace be with you.

John Stankus

UPDATED

August 2012

Right now I am besides myself following the recent surgeries. The Urologist has giving me a completely different outlook on life. There is life after treatment, I have found out. Just recently, I was given the opportunity to have a male sling and penile prosthesis installed. Both have given me the feelings and confidence of male human being again. I am very serious with that statement. You would not believe the confidence that it brings back.... What a change! Thank-you Doctor Walsh!!!! No more pads to wear! No more injections, hoping that they will work without any pain.... Oh the wonderful vacuum pump that creates pain and quickness at the same time. More updates will follow. I am just a very happy man, since I have found that there is help out there, you just need to find it. Just celebrated 34 years of marriage today with my wonderful wife Lori. She would also confess to the happiness after all of the grief that we have been through in the last couple of years. God Bless and Peace Be With You.

UPDATED

March 2013

Five months post op and I am still beside myself following the surgeries from the Urologist Doctor Walsh at the U of W that has given my wife and me a restart on life. There is life after treatment, and I have found it because of the right Doctors working with me.

The male sling and penile prosthesis have given me the feelings and confidence of an adult male human as it is supposed to be. The self-confidence and well-being that these corrections have brought back is unexplainable in any words.... What a difference to my extended life! Thank-you again, Doctor Walsh!!!! No more pads to wear or injections, or the wonderful vacuum pump that will be fun for other things.

There will be more updates will to follow. I am a very happy man again, since I have found that there is help out there, you just need to find the right Doctor to provide that assistance. My wife and I are going to celebrate 35 years of marriage this year and my wonderful wife Lori will confess to the happiness we have now, after all of the grief that we have been through in the last few years.

Currently I am speaking at different venues in regards to prostate cancer and my journey to get to where I am at this time in my life. It has been very rewarding to me as therapy and I believe has helped others see that they aren't the only ones out there.

God Bless and Peace Be With You.

UPDATED

May 2013

My current visit with the Doctor gave me news, the PSA is staying at 0.00 after 4+ years post treatment. Very happy and have hopes that it will continue. After my last surgery for the male sling and penile prosthesis, life is very good. It's not perfect, but they both work and make me feel like a some what normal male that can still have intercourse and can wear pants without pads. There is life after prostate cancer I have found. My wife and I are traveling to various events in different locations to speak about our journey with my prostate cancer. This has been a very rewarding and therapeutic experience for me. We have met many people and patients, so it has been informative to speak to the attendees about our experience. Thank-you for viewing. God Bless!

UPDATED

June 2014

Since the male sling and penile prosthesis surgeries, life has been much better. Each device has given me the feelings and confidence of an adult male human again. Thank-you again, Doctor Walsh!!!! There is life after cancer.

I am still speaking at different venues, regarding prostate cancer and my journey. The lectures are very rewarding to me and is great therapy. I believe the lectures has helped other patients see that they aren't the only ones out there and there is doctors that will help them.

God Bless and Peace Be With You.

UPDATED

July 2015

Currently, 3 years post op following the male sling and penile implant surgery. Doctor Walsh with the U of W replaced the reservoir that failed because of a leak, the day after X-mas 2014. Surgery went very well and things have been working all is good.

Had my 7 year follow-up with my Oncologist to check PSA and it is slowing rising. It's still .19. When it hits .2, then I get start the Lupron shots again. It will be wonderful to deal with the injections again. Prostate cancer is so giving with the unwanted gifts.

More updates will follow. Still a very happy man, since I found help out there. A patient just needs to find the right Doctor to provide that assistance they need.

Speaking at different venues about prostate cancer and my journey with cancer and where I am at this time in my life has helped me and many others. It has been a very rewarding experience and therapy for me to speak about prostate cancer to other patients. I believe the lectures have helped others see that they aren't the only ones out there. Plus, there are people that want to help guide patients through their journey with cancer.

God Bless and Peace Be With You.

UPDATED

August 2016

I'm 4 years post op following the male sling and penile implant surgery. Things have been working pretty good overall.

Had my 8 year follow-up with my Oncologist to check PSA. It's slowing rising, but still undetectable. That's good news to me. When it hits .2, then I get start the Lupron shots again. How wonderful to deal with the injections again. Not!

I've still be speaking at different venues about prostate cancer and my journey. This has helped me and many others talking about prostate cancer. A very rewarding experience and therapy for me to speak to other patients about prostate cancer.

More updates will follow. Thank for reading my story.

God Bless and Peace Be With You.

UPDATED

October 2017

Had my 9 year check-up and looking pretty good. Some elevation of the PSA, but no treatment scheduled. Implant working well so far and no complaints. Sling is another story that isn't working as well as expected. Been helping other patients with treatment options, which has been very therapeutic for me. Hope you are all doing well.

God bless and may the Lord be with you!

John's e-mail address is: stankus_john AT comcast.net (replace "AT" with "@")


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